How to pass your studies

During your studies you'll need to earn 120 credits in coursework and write a final thesis. You'll then be able to apply for the final state exam, which is the final step toward earning your degree.

120 credits

Credits are earned by successfully completing courses or through study abroad or internships.

You must earn 64 credits from compulsory courses, which comprise the core of the program and a significant portion of the topics for the final exam.

The remaining 56 credits can be earned through optional courses. Optional courses broaden the scope of the program and include also credits earned during study abroad (FSSn4410 Study Visit) or through an internship (FSSn4490 Placement Abroad or ESSn5900 Internship).

You can also earn up to 10 credits from courses offered by individual faculties and programs to all university students.

 

Master's thesis

You should register your thesis topic during the penultimate semester of your studies. You then have almost until the final state exam to devote to writing. The thesis should be at least 9,000 words including the bibliography (abstract and attachments are not counted). All essential information is available in the section "Master's thesis".

You obtain 20 credits for successfully completing the thesis through the compulsory course ESSn4500 Diploma Seminar. You should enroll in this course in the semester you plan to finish the thesis and complete your studies.

Final state exam

The final state exam takes place in conjunction with the thesis defense. It is structured in the form of a discussion between you and a panel of your teachers regarding three topics drawn by you, one from each of the major categories of the exam syllabus.

More detailed information about the exam, the exam syllabus, and several useful tips are available in the section "Final state exam".

Courses

  • 1st & 2nd semesters
    • Courses focused on practical functioning of the energy industry: environmental issues or courses about energy commodities
    • Courses with specific geographic focus: USA, Russia, Asian consumers.
    • Intensive courses providing additional contextual knowledge: economics, law, current trends
    • Internship
  • 2nd & 3rd semesters
    • Courses focused on analytical approaches and interpretations: theories and methods
    • Courses focused on the EU
    • Additional contextual courses
    • Study abroad
    • Selection of thesis topic (in connection with ESSn4001 Social Science Methodology)
  • 3rd & 4th semesters
    • Additional contextual courses
    • Study abroad, internship related to the thesis
    • Writing your thesis

Recommended study plan

Because we accept new students twice per year, we also have two recommended study plans—one starting in the fall, the other in the spring.

These study plans are recommended. They represent the best way to build continuously on your acquired knowledge and skills and to gain the most from your studies. If some other path suits you better, however, or you need to adjust your approach to suit a stay abroad or internship, you may select courses in a different order.

The study plans only include those courses that comprise the core of the program. Each semester, we also offer a range of other courses in cooperation with other study programs which may also interest you. You'll find them in the course registration application.

Starting in the fall

 

Semester

Compulsory Courses

Optional Courses

I. Fall

ESSn4003 Energy and Society: An Introduction

ESSn4008 Academic Skills Review

MEBn5015 Energy and Environment

ESSn5020 U.S. Energy Policy: Development and Challenges

MEBn5035 Introduction to Economics

MEBn5039 Oil and Gas Industry

II. Spring

ESSn4001 Social Science Methodology

ESSn4002 Energy in the Region: Czech Republic and its Neighbours

MEBn5012 Electricity Industry: Conventional Technologies

MEBn5014 Energy Policies in Asia

MEBn5042 Economics of Energy Corporations

III. Fall

ESSn4004 Energy Policy of the European Union

ESSn4007 Energy and Society: Theoretical Perspectives

MEBn5017 Electricity Industry: Renewable Energy

MEBn5033 Introduction to quantitative data analysis

MEBn5034 Social network analysis

MEBn5036 Energy in International Law

MEBn5037 Getting Employed in the Energy Sector

MEBn5038 Energy Law

MEBn5041 Contemporary Trends II.

IV. Spring

ESSn4500 Diploma Seminar

MEBn5038 Energy Law

MEBn5040 Contemporary Trends I. - Energy Poverty

 

Starting in the spring

Semester

Compulsory Courses

Optional Courses

I. Spring

ESSn4002 Energy in the Region: Czech Republic and its Neighbours

ESSn4008 Academic Skills Review

MEBn5012 Electricity Industry: Conventional Technologies

MEBn5014 Energy Policies in Asia

MEBn5038 Energy Law

II. Fall

ESSn4003 Energy and Society: An Introduction

ESSn4007 Energy and Society: Theoretical Perspectives

MEBn5015 Energy and Environment

MEBn5017 Electricity Industry: Renewable Energy

MEBn5033 Introduction to quantitative data analysis

MEBn5034 Social network analysis

MEBn5035 Introduction to Economics

MEBn5039 Oil and Gas Industry

III. Spring

ESSn4001 Social Science Methodology

MEBn5040 Contemporary Trends I. - Energy Poverty

MEBn5042 Economics of Energy Corporations

IV. Fall

ESSn4004 Energy Policy of the European Union

ESSn4500 Diploma Seminar

ESSn5020 U.S. Energy Policy: Development and Challenges

MEBn5036 Energy in International Law

MEBn5037 Getting Employed in the Energy Sector

MEBn5041 Contemporary Trends II.

 

Study & examination regulations

How many times can I repeat a course? How do I enroll? How many credits must I earn per semester? What rules must the lecturer follow when evaluating students? The answers to these and other questions can be found in the Masaryk University Study and Examination Regulations.